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Civil War Round Table of Arkansas

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Newsletter Archive - We have left these online because they contain valuable articles. For the most up-to-date Civil War Roundtable of Arkansas Newsletter please use the Newsletter button in the Menu. 


Our 42nd Year 
FOR THE MEETING TUESDAY,  Sep 26, 2006

Meets Fourth Tuesday, January-November

Founded March 1964 
Fletcher Branch Library, H & Buchanan
(East of University Ave.), 

Little Rock 
Program at 7 p.m. 
Online:  www.civilwarbuff.org
VOL. XLII, No. 9,
Jan Sarna, President  /  Charles O. Durnett, Editor, 
Dues $15 Per Year
VISITORS WELCOME! 

VISIT THE BATTLEFIELDS WHEN YOU CAN...
WHILE YOU CAN


Snarling Cormorants of Newspaper Filth:
" The Civil War Press of Arkansas."

 

By Dr. Michael B. Dougan

 


  Our speaker this month is Dr. Michael B. Dougan, author of Confederate Arkansas; The People and Politics of a Frontier State in Wartime (1976) and Community Diaries: Arkansas Newspapering, 1819-2002. He taught history for 36 years at Arkansas State University.

 

The author of many articles and books on various aspects of Arkansas history, he has been a regular speaker to the Roundtable for thirty years. A past president of the Arkansas Historical Society and recipient of the Lifetime Achievement Award, he endeavors to go canoeing on New Year’s Day.

Dr. Dougan’s topic will concern itself with another aspect of the Civil War, the newspapers. First, they fought a civil war over the idea of secession, and then another one against or for the controversial governor, Henry M. Rector, and finally, the last remaining editor in Arkansas, Jno. R. Eakin at Washington (old it is these days), carried on a rear guard action until the war’s end.

Although editors were pied and the type scattered, the double press held its own, unlike some Confederate armies.

Some of the papers available during the War of Northern Aggression:

 

Harper's Weekly is filled with important details of the critical precursors to the civil war.  The cover of the January 5, 1861 edition was an enlarged view of the Georgia Delegation in Congress at the start of the Civil War.





Atlanta Daily Register

Daily Missouri Republican [St. Louis]

Dallas Herald

[Des Arc, Ark.] The Constitutional Union,

Fort Smith New Era,

[Little Rock] Arkansas True Democrat,

[Little Rock] Daily State Journal,

[Little Rock] National Democrat,

[Little Rock] Old-Line Democrat,

[Little Rock] Unconditional Union,

[Little Rock] Weekly Arkansas Gazette,

Memphis Appeal [Memphis],

Mobile Register and Advertiser,

Natchez Daily Courier,

Washington [AR] Telegraph,

Yazoo Democrat [Yazoo City, MS],



PROGRAMS 2006/2007

 

October 24: Fred Williams

Federal Occupation of Little Rock

 

November 28:

TBA

 Election of Officers

 

December 2006

 No meeting Scheduled in December

 

January 23, 2007 - Randy Philhours

Marmaduke Walker Duel

 

February 27, 2007 - Bill Gurley, Ph.D.

Maj. Gen. Mosby M. Parsons'

Confederate Missouri Brigades

 

March 27, 2007

TBA

 

April 24, 2007

TBA

 

May 22, 2007  - Cal Collier

TBA

 

June 26, 2007  -  W. D. Honnoll

M. J. Thompson: The Swamp Fox

 

July 24, 2007

TBA

 

August 28, 2007

TBA

 

September 24, 2007

TBA

 

October 23, 2007

TBA

 

November 27, 2007

TBA

 

We Who Study

      Must Also Strive To Save!


CIVIL WAR TRIVIA QUIZ

 

BATTLEFIELD PLACES

 

THE FOLLOWING LIST OF NAMES REPRESENT LOCATIONS ON WELL KNOWN BATTLEFIELDS. NAME THE WELL KNOWN BATTLEFIELD THEY ARE ASSOCIATED WITH. FOR EXAMPLE, THE “HORNETS NEST” IS ASSOCIATED WITH SHILOH:

 


  • FORT STEADMAN

  • WEST WOOD
    THE MULE SHOE

    GRAVEYARD ROAD REDAN
    WIDOW TAPP’S FARM

    SNODGRASS HILL
    LITTLE SUGAR CREEK

    HAZEL GROVE
    ALMHOUSE

    TUNNEL HILL

     

     

     

    CONFEDERATE HEADSTONE

     

    A Confederate head stone was placed on the grave of Pvt. William Thompson, a Black Confederate who served in the 16th South Carolina Infantry. 
    The headstone was set on January 15, 2006 at a private cemetery in NW part of Conway.  The men from Kansas City set the headstone.

     

    Left to Right: Cmdr. Ed Kennedy of Camp 1857 of Kansas City, Kansas; Roger Mills Cmdr. Camp 615 of Conway, AR, Compatriot Tyrone Williams, descent of Thompson who lives in Kansas City, Kansas, a member of Camp 1857; and Col. Marc Williams.

     

    Left to Right: Cmdr. Ed Kennedy of Camp 1857 of Kansas City, Kansas; Roger Mills Cmdr. Camp 615 of Conway, AR, Compatriot Tyrone Williams, descent of Thompson who lives in Kansas City, Kansas, a member of Camp 1857; and Col. Marc Williams.


      JONESBORO MONUMENT

    Unlike many areas of the South, our section of northeast Arkansas never had a monument or inscribed stone to the valor and sacrifice of our local Confederate soldiers. This was possibly due to the limited resources of the citizens after the war, the influx of carpetbaggers, as well as the lack of an aggressive UDC Chapter in the 1920’s.

    Whatever the reason, there is no mention of the hundreds of men who fought with Cleburne, Jackson, Lee and others. Many of these gallant men never came home to Arkansas and now lay buried in unmarked graves across the Deep South.

    In an attempt to correct the wrongs of the past, the men of the Col. Robert G. Shaver Camp #1655 camp banded together to form a non-profit foundation called the Northeast Arkansas Southern Heritage Foundation.

    The foundation was formed taking members from the SCV, UDC, and the Northeast Arkansas Civil War Heritage Trails Association. One of the main projects for the foundation was locating a site and building a Confederate soldier’s monument and park.

    The site sets within the confines of two main roads leading out of town with very high visibility and traffic flow. It was here, in 1861 and 1862 that men from northeast Arkansas joined the Southern army and followed these roads into history.

    The site ownership is now held in the name of the Col. Robert G. Shaver Camp #1655. The site has a present market value of $35,000.00 and the site plan for the monument park has been approved by the city planning commission.

    Donations were made by contractors for dirt fill, site leveling, weed control and fertilizer. An electrical contractor is presently working on a list of materials to be donated for flag pole and monument lighting.

    Additionally, a family has offered to donate a 3 foot metal fence to be placed around the site. A local architect donated his time drawing final site plans. SCV members will erect the four flag poles and set eight Confederate military markers in front of the poles.

    Three phase dedication.

    The first dedication will be held in association with our state SCV reunion next April in Jonesboro. The first phase will include the flag poles, historic marker, military stones, a concrete base for the main monument, lighting, and fencing. The estimated cost of this first phase including land is $43,700.00 most of which has been donated or funds collected.

    The second dedication will take place when money for the ten foot high granite column with inscriptions is raised together with a family memorial brick pathway, battlefield urn and landscaping . The estimated cost of this second stage is $28,000.00. Money for this phase has not yet been raised.

    The third and final dedication will take place when the bronze infantry soldier is erected on the granite column. No cost estimates have yet been made for this last placement.

    The flag poles will fly the flag of 1776, the third national of the Confederacy, the battle flags of the period, and the flag of Arkansas. Every effort will be made to educate the citizens of this community and region concerning their Southern history by conducting living history events on site.

     


    Remembering Arkansas Confederates

    and

    the 1911 Little Rock Veterans Reunion

     

    Authors: Ray Hanley, Steve G. Hanley

    ISBN: 0738542989

    Price: $19.99

    # of Pages: 128

    Publisher:

    Arcadia Publishing

    Publication Date: 09/11/2006


    Arkansas seceded from the Union in 1861, opening a chapter in the state’s history that would change its destiny for decades. An estimated 6,862 Arkansas Confederate soldiers died from battle and disease, while some 1,700 Arkansas men died wearing Union blue. Total casualties, killed and wounded, represented 12 percent of the white men in the state between the ages of 15 and 62. Bloody, hard-fought battles included Pea Ridge, Helena, Little Rock, and the rare Confederate victory in southwest Arkansas at Jenkins’ Ferry. Following the war, the 1911 United Confederate Veterans Reunion included the largest parade ever in Arkansas. The Hanley’s book presents the Reunion in picture and word. The event has largely been neglected by history books. From the monuments and veterans to the loyal reenactors still gathering today, the story of the Civil War in Arkansas is remembered and preserved for coming generations

    The authors, Little Rock brothers Ray and Steven G. Hanley, with the help of many in the community, capture not only the war but also its influence on the state’s culture for the century that followed. Ray Hanley is an executive with a global technology company, and Steven is the director of volunteer services for a major nonprofit organization serving disabled children. Between them, they have produced a daily newspaper column for 20 years and numerous Arkansas history books.

    Additional Books:

    Around Little Rock: A Postcard History - AR

    Carroll & Boone County - AR

    Hot Springs - AR

    Jonesboro and Arkansas' Historic Northeast Corner Little Rock - AR

    Sebastian and Crawford Counties - AR

     

    This Book is available at Wordsworth Bookstore in the Heights, and the bookstore at the MacArthur Military Museum.

     

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    http://www.battleofperryville.com/
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    The following is a tentative overview of the activities we have planned for this year's Battle of Perryville 144th Anniversary Reenactment weekend. All activities will take place at Perryville Battlefield State Historic Site. Please check back in the future for more specific times as we will continually update our schedule of events.

     

    Saturday

    7:00 Sunrise Battle - Battle of Pottsville

    8:30 Don Rightmyer - The Battle of Pottsville

    9:00 W.  Greer Kentucky’s Lincoln Bicentennial

    9:30 Betty Jane Gorin - John Hunt Morgan’s Raid & The Battle of Tebbs Bend

    10:00 Betty Jane Gorin - Morgan Is Coming

    10:00 Battle Area - Horse Drawn Artillery

    10:00 Confederate soldier living history, Maney’s fence - 1:00 p.m.

    10:30 Dr. James Klotter - Kentucky During the Civil War

    10:30 Waveland Presentation

    11:00 White Hall Presentation

    11:00 Unreconstructed - Music History talk

    11:30 Glenna Christen - Period Women's Clothing

    11:30 Fort Boonesborough Presentation

    12:00 Old Fort Harrod Presentation

    12:30 Lincoln - Davis Debate

    12:30 Butler-Turpin House Presentation

    2:00 Saturday Battle The Fight for Loomis Heights

    3:30 Bill Christen - Pauline Cushman

    3:30 Liberty Hall Presentation

    4:00 Bill Christen - Book Signing Pauline Cushman; Spy of the Cumberland

    4:00 Artillery Demonstration

    4:00 Jack Jouett House Presentation

    5:00 Colemans - The Haunting War

    6:00 American Spiritual Ensemble

    6:00 Ghost Walk - 9:00 p.m.

    8:00 Variety Show

    8:00 Barn Dance - Music by Unreconstructed

     

    Sunday

     

    8:00 Period Church Service

    9:00 Medicine Show

    10:00 Bill Christen - Period Men's Clothing

    10:00 Confederate soldier living history,

    10:30 Battle Area - Cavalry Demonstration & Competition

    10:30 Lexington Vintage Dance Society

    11:00 Susan Hughes - Crinoline, Crape, and Corpses: 19th Century Funeral and Mourning Customs

    12:00 Ron Bryant - Frankfort: Kentucky's Embattled Capital and the Confederate Road to Perryville

    12:30 Colemans - Love Letters

    1:00 Don Rightmyer - Starkweather’s Brigade

    2:00 Sunday Battle - The Fight for the Open Knob

    3:00 Lincoln - Davis Debate

    4:00 David Dick - Kentucky - A State of Mind

    4:30 David Dick Book Signing Kentucky

     

    Ongoing Throughout the Day

    Jill Bailey - Emerald Zinnia Collection

    Dale Derrick - Medical Display

    Living History Village

     

    The village will open to the public on Saturday 9:00 a.m. till 9:00 p.m. Sunday camp will again open at 9:00 a.m. and close at 4:00 p.m. Activities and scenarios will be ongoing throughout the day.

     

    The Singing Milkmaids will perform throughout Saturday and Sunday hourly at the Opera House. The Opera House will be open Saturday evening at 8:00 p.m. for a special Variety Show - Napoleon’s Conquest of Egypt.

     

    We Who Study Must Also Strive To Save!

    SEE YOU TUESDAY NIGHT

    for Dr. Michael B. Dougan

    GOD BLESS AMERICA